Charcoal is all the rage. Is it good for our teeth?

Activated charcoal is a beauty and health trend ingredient that has found its way into everything from ice cream to toothpaste. My brother, who lives in Brooklyn, has been brushing his teeth with powdered activated charcoal. As an effective ingredient in oral care, I have my doubts. The Journal of the American Dental Association recently published an article on the efficacy and benefits of charcoal toothpaste, and the results of the study did not prove it to be the panacea for oral health.

Charcoal is abrasive, and may in fact be too abrasive to the teeth. Brushing with it can strip away precious enamel (the mineral substance that makes teeth white and strong) and enamel doesn’t grow back once its lost.

Furthermore, the charcoal toothpastes on the market don’t contain fluoride, a substance the American Dental Association indicates as preventative against dental tooth decay.

While more research can be done on charcoal toothpaste, as of now Richards Frankel Dentistry would not promote daily use of it. However, l did enjoy some delicious charcoal ice cream this summer in Toronto….it turned my tongue black!

You heard it from the dentist’s mouth!

Best, Dr. Margaret Frankel

Sleep Disordered Breathing – Is It Affecting You?

Did you know 20% of adults suffer from sleep-disordered breathing (and 90% go undiagnosed)? Obstructive sleep apnea can lead to headaches, acid reflux, jaw joint pain and depression & anxiety. It can also damage the oral cavity via nighttime teeth grinding, clenching and mouth breathing.

Sleep dentistry is a growing field and comprehensive dentists now understand how to treat symptoms and repair the damage to teeth caused by sleep apnea.

We explore how sleep-disordered breathing may be affecting you and share how you can promote oral health in the recent issue of CJN’s Smile! special section.

Click here to read the full article.

Xylitol: The Natural Sugar that Actually Protects Your Teeth Against Decay

Xylitol. It’s time that you began ADDING this sugar to your diet. What is xylitol? Xylitol is a natural sugar; it is even made by the human body when it metabolizes ingested carbohydrates. Xylitol can be used as a sugar substitute ( a cane sugar substitute). It is safe for diabetics, as it has a low glycemic index. It is also lower calorie than traditional sugar.  We harvest most xylitol today from corn stalk fiber.

In dentistry, research has shown that xylitol reduces caries rate. This means that xylitol works to reduce your risk for cavities. Along with brushing, flossing and using fluoride, regular exposure to xylitol will prevent cavities!

How does xylitol work? Xylitol prevents cavities in several ways. One way is that it keeps the pH of the mouth at a level that makes it hard for cavity-causing bacteria to degrade your teeth. Xylitol also helps prevent plaque accumulation on the teeth. Oral bacteria thrive in the presence of sugar, but not in the presence of xylitol.

You can cook with xylitol. So go ahead, make a lower calorie version of chocolate chip cookies with it. Or, begin chewing xylitol gum. We have xylitol sugar packets at our office. Ask to sample them. Or, buy a pack of xylitol gum from us and fight tooth decay! 5 exposures to xylitol daily will prevent cavities. Just make sure you don’t ingest more than 50g a day.

Our office is always striving to help our patients PREVENT dental health diseases. We want to keep our patients at their optimal oral health, and xylitol can help!

Keeping you healthy,

Dr. Frankel

 

 

 

Back To School Means Back to the Dentist! Find Out About Our Sweet Deal!

Have you or your children skipped the dentist all summer? It’s time to get back on track before school starts! August has arrived, and here is a little motivation to make Richards Frankel Dentistry a priority this month:

Come experience Richards Frankel Dentistry: This coupon entitles you and any family members to a complimentary new patient exam when you schedule in the month of August.

Call our office today: 440-442-4477

Visit us online at http://www.richardsfrankeldentistry.com/

Stroke and It’s Relationship to Oral Bacteria- Study Finds Link!

In the American Dental Association’s most recently newsletter, a study linking the oral bacteria Strep Mutans (the bacteria that causes cavities) to acute stroke was highlighted. Below is an excerpt from the article:

“Study Finds Association Between Oral Bacteria And Stroke.”

Science Daily (2/16) hosted a University of Louisville release stating researchers at the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center in Osaka, Japan studied patients entering the hospital for acute stroke, finding “an association between certain types of stroke and the presence of the oral bacteria (cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans).” Dr. Robert P. Friedland, a neurology professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine and a co-author of the study, said, “The study and related work in our labs have shown that oral bacteria are involved in several kinds of stroke, including brain hemorrhages and strokes that lead to dementia.” The study is published online in Scientific Reports.” -http://www.ada.org/en/

 

Your oral health can have a great impact on your overall health. The oral cavity is colonized with many types of bacteria, some good and some bad. The balance between the two is fine, and your dentist and the dental team must play an integrative role in keeping this balance in the favor of the good bacteria. Your life may depend on it! Regular dental visits cannot be undervalued if you want to stay healthy.

Please call Richards Frankel Dentistry today for your appointment: 440-442-4477 and make a step towards health and well-being.

Signs of stroke include: Face drooping, arm weakness, slurred speech, time to call 911!- FAST!

Working to keep you and your family healthy,

Dr. Frankel and staff

Your Sugar Intake and Its Relationship to Your Dental Health.

Did you know that added sugar is in most processed foods today? And, it is no surprise that sugary beverages and sugar in foods can cause major dental issues including decay and dental erosion. Added sugar has become such a health issue that the U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services and Dept. of Agriculture created updated nutritional guidelines. The updated guidelines are below:

The American Dental Association News reports that “the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Agriculture released updated nutritional guidelines Jan. 7 calling for Americans to limit their intake of added sugars.” The updated guidelines “advise limiting the intake of added sugars to less than 10 percent of total calories consumed each day,” marking the “first time the guidelines have recommended a quantitative limit on a specific type of food.” The guidelines essentially limit our sugar intake to 12 teaspoons a day.

Sugar doesn’t just cause cavities in the mouth, it also melts away enamel ( the hardest material in the body), leaving the inside of the tooth exposed and sensitive. Extra sugar is bad for our overall health and our dental health.

If you have any concerns about your teeth, and if you think the amount of sugar in your diet is causing dental issues, call our office today: 440-442-4477.

For information about diet and dental health, visit MouthHealthy.org.

photos by:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2575460/The-sugary-drinks-snacks-ONE-without-breaching-new-guidelines-daily-intake.html
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/lemons-burn-holiday-calories-article-1.275144
http://www.mysticalraven.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/person-eating-a-sugar-cube.jpg

 

Halloween is Scary. Your Dentist Shouldn’t Be!

Richards Frankel Dentistry isn’t a scary place. In fact, our patients actually enjoy visiting our office. We do all that we can to make our patients comfortable while they are at the dentist. Blankets? We offer them to you. A little mouth prop to help you open your mouth? Yep, we have that too. How about bottled water? Sure. A friendly and caring staff? Yes, absolutely! Headphones? Yes. A dentist who is kind, smart and understanding? That’s certainly what you’ll find at our dental practice. These are just a few ways we put you at ease while you’re under our care.

Don’t put off going to the dentist because it isn’t pleasant, or because you’re afraid. Find a dental office that is the right fit for you. Richards Frankel dentistry goes out of its way to make sure you are comfortable while here, and that you are well informed about your painless dental treatments. We focus on preventative and restorative care. Our goal is to keep you and your mouth healthy and do it in a friendly environment.

So before you go buy Halloween candy in bulk, I encourage those who haven’t been to the dentist in a SCARY long time to call us first!

Happy Halloween, Dr. Frankel

 

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Millennials and the Dentist!

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Meet TJ. He is now cavity free (yay TJ)! Unlike many millennials, TJ visits the dentist. By visiting the dentist TJ has healthy teeth and gums. What does that mean for TJ? He is less likely to have bigger, more expensive dental complications down the road. Dr. Frankel monitors his oral health closely, so that no major issues arise. Oh, and the benefits of a healthy mouth affect the entire body. TJ’s gums are healthy and have less bacteria, so that means inflammation throughout his body will be lower as well.

Millennials, just because you are young and healthy, doesn’t mean you can skip the dentist. Dental issues arise microscopically and grow larger over time. Keep your mouth healthy and your entire body will thank you. Don’t put off going to the dentist until something hurts. Be proactive, take your oral health seriously.

Richards Frankel Dentistry gets it. We know you’re busy. We know you’re healthy. Yet, don’t let your oral health slip, it will impact your overall health and the health of your wallet later. Thank you TJ, for seeing the dentist regularly- you are doing right by your body (and you only get one of those)!

 

brush and floss daily,

Dr. Frankel

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Curious About Bad Breath? Ted-Ed Talks Bad Breath!

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Have you ever been curious as how bad breath forms? Well, recently a Ted-Ed talk reviewed the phenomena of bad breath, scientifically referred to as Halitosis. On April 2nd, The Huffington Post reported that a TED-Ed video narrated by professor Mel Rosenberg explains the causes and origins of Halitosis, which, the Huffington Post reported, “all comes down to the activity of bacteria in the mouth.” The video points out that habits, such as smoking or drinking alcohol heavily can also cause distinct odors on the oral cavity, but that bacteria build-up in the gums between the teeth and on the back of the tongue are the primary cause of halitosis.

Proper oral hygiene and a healthy diet can help keep halitosis at bay, and “the American Dental Association recommends brushing twice per day, flossing and making regular trips to your dentist.” Richards Frankel Dentistry is happy to answer any questions you may have about bad breath, and can review possible reasons it may be affecting you, and how to help keep it at bay.

 

Call us today: 440-442-4477

Best, Dr. Frankel

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