Surviving Leftover Halloween Candy – A Dental Health Guide

Don’t let Halloween treats play tricks on your teeth.

While all that mouth-watering candy is delightful to the taste buds, it’s important to have a post-Halloween plan to keep your pearly whites in tip-top shape. Sugar is not only food for our bodies, it’s food for the bacteria in our mouth that cause cavities.

Before you delve into that remaining Halloween candy, here is a list of common candies and their negative impact on your teeth:

Hard Candy

This type of candy typically lingers in your mouth, leading to potentially hazardous consequences. You are essentially bathing your teeth in sugar and feeding that harmful bacteria – yikes, now that is scary!

Sour Candy

The acidity of sour candy can weaken tooth enamel, making them more prone to decay. Acids of any kind, such as those found in beverages, are also bad for the enamel on your teeth. Intake should be limited and remember to always rinse your mouth out with water after ingestion.

Chocolate

If you have to choose the “lesser of the evils,” then chocolate is probably your best bet. However, chocolate still contains sugar and sticks to teeth.

Sticky and Gummy Candies

Unfortunately, sticky and gummy candies are some of the worst candies for your teeth because they are harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth. This gives cavity-causing bacteria more time to do its dirty work.

Popcorn Balls

Kernels can get stuck between your teeth, so be sure to floss after you enjoy this popular fall treat. Remember, it’s not just about the teeth – it’s so important to keep our gums healthy as well!

Dr. Frankel Volunteers at Give Kids A Smile Day

On Friday, February 5th participating states celebrated Give Kids a Smile Day. In Cleveland, Case School of Dental Medicine was a proud provider of dental services to area Cleveland City School District children. Dr. Frankel acted among the volunteers at Case, teaching students and guiding them as they performed dental cleanings, xrays and sealants to children in the community.

Dr. Frankel believes in giving back to the community in many ways, especially through her profession. As the poster in the image above reads “Dental caries in the single most common chronic childhood disease”, and it is important to intervene early in life.

Whether Dr. Margaret Frankel is providing care in her office or out in the community, she truly values the health and well-being of her patients. Dental caries is a bacterial infection. It is so important to keep your family’s mouth healthy. Richards Frankel Dentistry welcomes children and families, and we strive to keep our patients at their optimal oral health.

Back-to-School Means Complimentary Exams at Richards Frankel Dentistry!

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For new patients and patients who haven’t been to our office in over a year: we are offering you a free dental exam when you book your hygiene appointment (your dental well-visit and “cleaning”).

This offer represents a $90 value for children and $100 for adults!

Call or email us today – we look forward to caring for you and your family!

From one parent to another,

Dr. Frankel

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“Drawing competition for school kids” by liz west is licensed under CC BY

Prenatal Vitamin D Intake and Your Child’s Cavities!

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Recent research released and published online in the “Annals of Epidemiology” shows a strong correlation between Prenatal Vitamin D intake and caries rate in children. The risk of cavities was lower in the mothers with higher Vitamin D intake during pregnancy.

 

Pregnant women should make sure they are getting enough Vitamin D during pregnancy, as it has many benefits to both mother and baby. Among those benefits may now also be a lower risk of cavities in your children!

Just a little Wednesday wisdom!

Best, Dr. Frankel

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New Recommendations for Infants and Expectant Mothers!

 

I want to share some INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT INFORMATION with you that was recently released by the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Infants need to visit the dentist, and infants need fluoride to make their teeth stronger! Even though baby teeth do fall out to give way to permanent adult teeth, they need to remain healthy as they can affect the health of the adult teeth underneath. And, pregnant mothers need to have a healthy oral environment so that they reduce the amount of dangerous bacteria they pass onto baby.

 

The Chicago Tribune‘s Danielle Braf reported on new recommendations for expecting mothers and children, and several were regarding oral care for both mothers and infants.  According to the Tribune’s article, The American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends that infants are exposed to fluoride toothpaste once their teeth begin to come in, and that babies ingest  fluoridated tap water rather than bottled water, and that mothers receive routine oral health assessments during pregnancy.

 

  • How do you administer fluoride toothpaste to infants? Rub a grain-of-rice sized toothpaste on an infant’s teeth and let it stay there. Fluoride helps strengthen the tooth and prevents cavities.
  • Use fluoridated tap water in sippy cups, or in bottles. Bottled water doesn’t contain fluoride.

In 2013, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended that routine oral health assessments should be done during pregnancy, and they published that dental X-rays also are safe throughout pregnancy.

Pregnancy can result in changes in gums and teeth, and cavity-causing bacteria can be transmitted from mother to baby. About 40 percent of pregnant women in the United States have some form of periodontal disease, including inflammation of the gums, cavities and periodontics, so it’s important that they continue to have dental work done throughout their pregnancies. Root canals and filling cavities is permitted and encouraged during pregnancy!

I hope this helps you take care of yourself and your little ones!

Best, Dr. Frankel

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Tatiana’s First Visit to the Dentist

 

Here is Tatiana with our awesome assistant, Christina! Today was Tatiana’s first visit to the dentist. Christina helped to make her feel at ease with our dinosaur, Mr. Flossisaurus. She also got to wear a really cool pair of sunglasses so that our bright lights didn’t shine in her eyes. Your child’s first trip to the dentist should be a pleasant one. It is always best to prepare your child for his/her visit, but never use language they may scare your child. You can tell your child that the dentist’s office is a great place and that dentists keep you healthy and smiling. Tatiana did a great job today, and so can your child. Don’t wait too long to get your child into the dentist, it is best to allow them to be comfortable at the dentist so that subsequent experiences will be positive!

From one parent to another,

Dr. Frankel

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